Stories I’ve enjoyed in the last little while

The House on the Moon, William Alexander (Uncanny)

The Oracle and the Sea, Megan Arkenberg (Beneath Ceaseless Skies)

Psychopomps of Central London, Julia August (The Dark)

Mountaineering, Leah Bobet (Strange Horizons)

By the Hand That Casts It, Stephanie Charette (Shimmer)

Odontogenesis, Nino Cipri (Fireside)

Octopus, Martha Darr (Fiyah)

Court of Birth, Court of Strength, Aliette de Bodard (Beneath Ceaseless Skies)

Stet, Sarah Gailey (Fireside)

A House by the Sea, P.H. Lee (Uncanny)

The Coin of Heart’s Desire, Yoon Ha Lee (Lightspeed)

The Foodie Federation’s Dinosaur Farm, Luo Longxiang (translated by Andy Dudak) (Clarkesworld)

Cerise Sky Memories, Wendy Nikel (Nature)

The Bodice, the Hem, the Woman, Death, Karen Osborne (Beneath Ceaseless Skies)

The Court Magician, Sarah Pinsker (Lightspeed)

Tamales in Space, and Other Phrases for the Beginning Speaker, Gabriela Santiago (Strange Horizons)

Spatiotemporal Discontinuity, Bogi Takács (Uncanny)

Abigail Dreams of Weather, Stu West (Uncanny)

Disconnect, Fran Wilde (Uncanny)

Ruby Singing, Fran Wilde (Beneath Ceaseless Skies)

Broadens the mind, I hear

I recently sold my 150th story, which was a very nice feeling indeed and one I’ll explore more in my next newsletter. (I am trying to have somewhat non-overlapping content between my monthly newsletter and this blog. We’ll see how that goes.) But it was also a type of story I wanted to talk about more specifically here.

That is: it’s a story that was inspired by my trip to Finland and Sweden in 2016. It’s the fourth story in that category I’ve written and the fourth I’ve sold, and while it’s two years in the past, I’m pretty sure there are more coming. None of them are related to each other in any other way. Different speculative elements–different genres–different characters and settings. But I couldn’t have gotten to any of them from the same angle without traveling.

I didn’t plan any of them before we went. I just went and looked and listened and smelled and tasted and felt and thought and felt and thought and came home and read and felt and thought some more, and lo, there were some stories there.

I haven’t started on the stories inspired by the trip to Denmark and Iceland yet, but I know they’re there. (I even know the shape of at least two….)

People who don’t write, who are not frequently around writers except when I bring them around–people like my grandma–often think of travel for writing purposes as linear and planned. If I’m doing this trip for writing purposes, it must mean that I intend to set a book in one of the locations and am going to go give it a good hard squint and see what I get out of it. But…a few months ago I outlined a book inspired by these experiences, and it was just as unanticipated as the stories. And while I’m going to use the experience to revise an old book set in various parts of Finland, that’s not what I was there for–I didn’t know I’d ever get the right ideas to revise that book into something coherent.

It’s culturally much harder to say, “I’m going to write what I’m inspired to write.” We’re taught to look down on that kind of vague approach even within creative fields. Have a plan, be able to justify yourself, don’t just…be one of those irresponsible artists who flits around hoping for inspiration, ugh, what is that even. Well, I don’t hope for inspiration, I work for inspiration. I open doors and windows to inspiration, I leave out honey traps for inspiration, I sew gossamer nets to catch the very finest particles and smallest species of inspiration. And this only works if you’re not already convinced of where it isn’t.

Obviously this doesn’t mean that everyone has to travel to be open to new external input. Not everyone has the resources in whatever direction; sometimes I don’t have the resources. But I actually feel that making room for frivolity is essential. For books where you don’t know what chapter will help with your current project–or whether any chapters will help with any projects at all. For other people’s art, primarily as its own thing and only as a jumping-off point later if ever. For finding the road nearest your house that you’ve never been on and taking it and finding out whether there’s a bespoke foam merchant there, an antique shop, a greasy spoon, a park. For going to the free museum night to see an exhibit that has done the traveling for you. Not because you know how it’ll inspire you, but because you don’t.

I went to Montreal two weeks ago. I’ve been to Montreal many times. I love Montreal and have opinions about gelato available near different Metro stops. Vive Montreal. And even on this short trip, mostly full of conventions, I still discovered places I’ve never been, and I still looked at the places I have been and thought of them differently. Not in the “I must look into the Viau Metro and make sure I can put a story thing there” way. Just as: here I am, what else is here, who else. It makes me more able to do more of the same when I get home. I have no idea where it’ll end. And that’s an extremely good thing.

Next time I have a major trip–who knows when that will be–I will get asked whether I’m setting a book there, what book, why. I’m really happy that I don’t know.

This Will Not Happen to You (and Others)

New story! This Will Not Happen to You is out in Uncanny‘s Disabled People Destroy Science Fiction issue. I’m very happy to be ripping the fabric of spacetime with these fine people.

So happy, in fact, that I also have an interview and an essay, Malfunctioning Space Stations, in the same issue. The latter is a reprint from the Kickstarter for this issue, so it may be familiar to some of you. Still, I’m glad to see it out there again.

Short stories I’ve enjoyed recently

It’s time once again for that regular feature of this blog: short stories I’ve enjoyed recently! Occasionally a poem sneaks in here too, but mostly it’s what it says on the tin.

To This You Cling, With Jagged Fingernails, by Beth Cato, Fireside

Rapture, by Meg Elison, Shimmer

Carborundum > /Dev/Null, by Annalee Flower Horne, Fireside: serious content warning here, this is a disturbing story that deals with not only sexual violence but lack of trust around its reporting.

Furious Girls, by Juliana Goodman, Fiyah Issue 6

Periling Hand, by Justin Howe, Beneath Ceaseless Skies

Midnight Burritos with Zozrozir, by Rachael K. Jones , Daily Science Fiction

When I Was Made, by Kathryn Kania, Robot Dinosaur Fiction

Robo-Liopleurodon!, by Darcie Little Badger, Robot Dinosaur Fiction

The Chariots, the Horsemen, by Stephanie Malia Morris, Apex

Yard Dog, by Tade Thompson, Fiyah Issue 7

Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Memphis Minnie Sing the Stumps Down Good, by LaShawn M. Wanak, Fiyah Issue 7

If you didn’t like progress, here’s a tornado

Unexpectedly another thing of mine for you to read while I pack: this blog post on the Analog website is about the novelette I have in the current issue of Analog (“Left to Take the Lead”) and also about tornadoes and rebuilding and healing and community: https://theastoundinganalogcompanion.com/2018/08/07/it-all-comes-around-again/

Short stories I’ve enjoyed in the last bit

It’s time once again for a short story recommendation post! As usual, please feel free to recommend stories to me in the comments, because I make no pretense of having read everything–if you see a magazine listed, it doesn’t mean I’ve read everything from that magazine, even.

The Velvet Castles of the Night, by Claire Eliza Bartlett, Daily Science Fiction

Time, Like Water, by Amal El-Mohtar, The Rubin

The Things That We Will Never Say, by Vanessa Fogg, Daily Science Fiction

The Guitar Hero, by Maria Haskins, Kaleidotrope

Five Functions of Your Bionosaur, by Rachael K. Jones, Robot Dinosaur Fiction

A Complex Filament of Light, by S. Qioyu Lu, Anathema

A Cradle of Vines, by Jennifer Mace, Cast of Wonders

The Thing In the Walls Wants Your Small Change, by Virginia M. Mohlere, Luna Station Quarterly

Blessings, by Naomi Novik, Uncanny

Even to the Teeth, by Karen Osborne

50 Ways to Leave Your Fairy Lover, by Aimee Picchi, Fireside

Canada Girl vs. The Thing Inside Pluto, by Lina Rather, Flash Fiction Online

The Sweetness of Honey and Rot, by A. Merc Rustad, Beneath Ceaseless Skies

Sonya Taaffe’s די ירושה, Uncanny (for some reason the text box will not let me enter this in the opposite order…)

Dear David, by Yael van der Wouden, Longleaf Review

Small Things Pieced Together, by Ginger Weil, Robot Dinosaur Fiction

In the End, It Always Turns Out the Same, by A.C. Wise, The Dark

Fascism and Facsimiles, by John Wiswell, Fireside

Minds of the future….

Today you can read a new story by me in Nature Futures, My Favourite Sentience. I’ve adjusted the spelling of the title because the characters in it are in fact British, and their teacher would mark them down if they spelled it the American way! So many sentiences to choose from….

There’s also a writing of the story blog post, but obviously read the story itself first.